Is MSA a prion disease?

The fundamental cause of multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a loss of oligodendroglial and neuronal cells in the brain and central nervous system. The loss of cells is gradual and progressive, leading to slowly worsening symptoms.

Degeneration is found in three parts of the nervous system: the basal ganglia, the cerebellum, and parts of the brain that regulate the autonomic nervous system. The basal ganglia are a set of nerves in the cerebrum that in part control voluntary movements. The cerebellum also controls voluntary muscle movements and contributes to balance.

However, what triggers the initial and ongoing loss of cells is unknown.

 

Read the full article HERE.

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  • Guest - Dr. Frank Bastian

    The identification of alpha-synuclein is interesting and may be important
    in eventually labeling MSA as a TSE. However, the author is jumping to
    conclusions since his basic premise is that this is a prion or
    self-replicating protein. The fact that spiroplasma induce formation of
    alpha-synuclein in tissue culture would suggest that a bacterium with that
    capability could be involved. Amyloids increase by self-assembly and a
    bacterium could initiate the process. THE BASIC PREMISE THAT AMYLOIDS SELF
    REPLICATE AND CAUSE DISEASE SUCH AS AD AND CJD IS WRONG, AND I OR OTHERS
    THAT TAKE UP THE TORCH WILL EVENTUALLY PROVE THAT TO BE THE CASE.

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